(In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful)

(In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful)

Urdu meanings of BEARD with examples

Beard
(Dahri_ Darhi)

Sr.English WordsUrdu Words
1 BEARD
Adjective
بیئرڈ ۔ ریش ڈاڑھی ۔ مردوں کے رخساروں ٹھوڑی پر پائے جانے والے بال ۔ کئی ممالیہ جانوروں کی ٹھوڑی پر بال ہوتے ہیں ۔ مختلف غلوں اور گھاس کی پھلیوں میں پائے جانے والے ریشے ۔
2 BEARD

بيرڈ ۔ داڑھی ۔ ريش ۔
3 BEARD

مقابلہ کرنا ۔
4 BEARD
Noun
ڈاڑھی ، ریشں ، مچھلیوں کے لمبے بال ، اناج کے بھٹے یا بالیوں کے مہین ریشے ۔
5 BEARD
Noun
ڈاڑھی ۔ ريش ۔

beard

[beerd]

noun
1.
the growth of hair on the face of an adult man, often including a mustache.
2.
Zoology. a tuft, growth, or part resembling or suggesting a human beard, as the tuft of long hairs on the lower jaw of a goat or the cluster of hairlike feathers at the base of the bill in certain birds.
3.
Botany. a tuft or growth of awns or the like, as on wheat or barley.
4.
a barb or catch on an arrow, fishhook, knitting needle, crochet needle, etc.
5.
Also called bevel neck. Printing.
  1. the sloping part of a type that connects the face with the shoulder of the body.
  2. British. the space on a type between the bottom of the face of an x-high character and the edge of the body, comprising both beard and shoulder.
  3. the cross stroke on the stem of a capital G.
verb (used with object)
6.
to seize, pluck, or pull the beard of:
The hoodlums bearded the old man.
7.
to oppose boldly; defy:
It took courage for the mayor to beard the pressure groups.
8.
to supply with a beard.

Related forms

beardlike, adjective
unbeard, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
7. confront, brave, dare, face, challenge.

Beard

[beerd]
noun
1.
Charles Austin, 1874–1948, and his wife Mary, 1876–1958, U.S. historians.
2.
Daniel Carter, 1850–1941, U.S. artist and naturalist: organized the Boy Scouts of America in 1910.
3.
James Andrew, 1903–85, U.S. cooking teacher and food writer.

Examples from the web for beard

  • It is the face of a man of about forty, with a small beard and a high colour.
  • The head has a long mane, beard, prominent eyes, crest on nose, but no horns.
  • He was short and lively, wore a beard and simple peasant garb.

Word Origin and History for beard

n.
Old English beard "beard," from West Germanic *barthaz (cf. Old Frisian berd, Middle Dutch baert, Old High German bart, German bart), seemingly from PIE *bhardh-a- "beard" (cf. Old Church Slavonic brada, Lithuanian barzda, and perhaps Latin barba "beard").
The Greek and Roman Churches have long disputed about the beard. While the Romanists have at different times practised shaving, the Greeks, on the contrary, have strenuously defended the cause of long beards. Leo III. (795 AD) was the first shaved Pope. Pope Gregory IV., after the lapse of only 30 years, fulminated a Bull against bearded priests. In the 12th century the prescription of the beard was extended to the laity. Pope Honorius III. to disguise his disfigured lip, allowed his beard to grow. Henry I. of England was so much moved by a sermon directed against his beard that he resigned it to the barber. Frederick Barbarossa is said to have been equally tractable. [Tom Robinson, M.D., "Beards," "St. James's Magazine," 1881]
Pubic hair sense is from 1600s (but cf. neþir berd "pubic hair," late 14c.); in the 1811 "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," the phrase beard-splitter is defined as, "A man much given to wenching" (see beaver ).
v.
c.1300, "to grow or have a beard," from beard (n.). The sense of "confront boldly and directly" is from Middle English phrases such as rennen in berd "oppose openly" (c.1200), reproven in the berd "to rebuke directly and personally" (c.1400), on the same notion as modern slang get in (someone's) face. Related: Bearded ; bearding.

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